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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 16, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at two: donald trump promises a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. obama said they will go to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen, then he had to retract. that was a bad statement. i think you're doing great. northern ireland's power sharing government looks set to collapse today, sparking fresh elections. i'm at stormont, whether clock is ticking inevitably, it seems, towards the collapse of disassembly and what could be a election campaign. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed at a beach resort in tunisia in 2015 opens at the high court in london. former football coach barry bennell appears in court and pleads not guilty to child sex offences. also in the next hour, reunited after 18 years. the biological father of the teenager snatched from hospital when she was just eight hours old speaks for the first time
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about their reunion. answer andy murray wins his first grand slam match since becoming world number one. here's a flea through to the second round of the australian open. —— he is safely through. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. just days before taking over the white house, president—elect donald trump has promised a quick trade deal with britain. the former cabinet minister and brexit campaigner, michael gove — who interviewed mr trump for the times newspaper — said the president—elect was enthusiastic about britain leaving the eu and that the offer of a us trade deal would strengthen theresa may's hand in the brexit negotiations with brussels. speaking to reporters on his way into a meeting of foreign ministers in brussels, borisjohnson described mr trump's comments as very positive. our political correspondent
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ben wright reports. by friday, he'll be president, the most powerful politician in the world. and getting a visit in first, formerjustice secretary and brexit campaigner, michael gove, presenting the president—elect with a chance to boast about his brexit foresight. i thought the uk was so smart in getting out. you were there and you guys put it on the front page, "trump said that brexit will happen". yes. right? and it happened. everyone thought i was crazy. obama said they'll go to the back of the line, meaning, if it does happen... and then he had to retract it. that was a bad statement. and now we are at the front of the the queue? i think you're doing great. so perhaps not the front of the trade deal queue and the uk can only start to negotiate once
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we've left the eu, but michael gove was clearly pleased with his visit to trump tower and the president's enthusiasm for britain and brexit. it is clearly the case that he has an agenda, a business agenda, which has some potential for britain to benefit from. this all matters to a british government of the brink of leaving the eu. for now, though, it was business as usual for the foreign secretary i think it's very good news the united states of america wants to do a good free trade deal with us and wants to do it very fast. as the uk plans to go it alone, theresa may will make a major speech tomorrow setting out the deal she wants from brexit. but we already have some big clues. the prime minister has strongly hinted that britain will leave the single market, with its free movement of goods, finance and people. that's because she wants uk control over eu migration and freedom from eu law. we know theresa may wants to trigger exit negotiations by the end of march, and she thinks negotiations can be done within two years. so britain would be out of the eu by early 2019.
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but there is so much we don't know as well. what sort of access to the european union single market will britain get and what conditions will the eu demand? will britain be completely free to strike trade deals with other countries? and how long will they take? i think it is a good thing. who will reject the idea of a new trade deal between the uk and us? although i don't think it will remotely match the scale of our trade relationships with the rest of the european union. in the united kingdom and the rest of europe, is that you now have two major world figures who basically wish europe ill, they want to see the union will fall apart. one is vladimir putin and the other is donald trump. but britain needs cheerleaders for brexit, friends to cut deals and rhetorically, at least, the government has one in trump. let's go to our correspondent in
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brussels, gavin lee. probably a shrug of the shoulder would be the nearest to a physical reaction from eu officials? yes, if there is talk ofa eu officials? yes, if there is talk of a fast and fair deal across the atlantic, you don't hear that in brussels. the european commission reiterated through a spokeswoman today that any talk, formal or otherwise, is categorically off the table for the next two years until the end of march 2019. assuming theresa may launches article 50 by the end of this march, that process of untying from the eu, 80,000 legal pages of all sorts of specifics from the passport checking system, from fishing rights to the sale of fruit and oranges, all of that will take time. the commission are saying you cannot have any other trade talks until the divorce process is over. the big eu issue is what they can do about that, and that is not clear at
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this stage. but the commission spokeswoman said it is absolute. given the talks we are hearing from the atlantic from the likes of nigel farage, the former ukip leader saying he expects some kind of deal to be done in three months, that is off the table. and in terms of what donald trump says, it always makes for good headlines, but they will be more concerned about what theresa may has to say in the morning. more concerned about what theresa may has to say in the morninglj think so. the central thrust of the speculation is that theresa may will give some kind of clarity on whether 01’ give some kind of clarity on whether or not britain stays in the single market. if britain was to pull out of the single market, that is one of the big questions over trade deals come into play. not only will britain have to discuss with the likes of donald trump and we know with the new zealand prime ministers, but every country behind me in the european commission, that will take time. whilst people are concerned, particularly the likes of angela merkel, hearing that donald trump believes that nato is obsolete
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and the european union is a failed project, that does reverberate here. but they are waiting for tomorrow's speech. let's go to westminster and oui’ speech. let's go to westminster and our chief political correspondent vicki young. while donald trump said we we re vicki young. while donald trump said we were doing great comedy did not say we would go to the front of the queue. no. it was interesting. michael gove was prompting him to say we are offered in mind, and he didn't go there. but he said as much as he could. he was making all the right noises. the reality of whether this can happen is more complicated, not just because of this can happen is more complicated, notjust because of those eu rules, but whether, when donald trump gets into the white house, will this be his priority? he has said he wants to protect american trait. how decent a deal would be for britain? but there is no doubt that this is a boost to theresa may ahead of going into those negotiations. that is because when you go into the negotiations, you want to look and
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feel strong. so having this kind of backing will be useful for her, particularly as we have been hearing that it looks like she is heading towards britain leaving the single market. we don't know how much she will say about that tomorrow, blah but if that is the case, she will need traders around the world, whether it is with the new zealand prime minister or with australia and other countries. that will be extremely useful. we have had a lot of indications now from the government about how they see this. it was particularly striking yesterday from the chancellor philip hammond, trying to say to the eu that this is notjust about britain getting a good deal or you punishing us getting a good deal or you punishing us for daring to leave the club. a good deal has to be good for both of us. good deal has to be good for both of us. there is no point in doing down the british economy and tried to do a deal which is not going to help the eu as well. that is how they are trying to turn the focus of this debate. for political nerds like you and me, it is interesting how the last year has changed things. you have michael gove doing a interview
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for the times newspaper and reaction from the foreign secretary, boris johnson. from the foreign secretary, boris johnson. of course, we predicted all of this?! and especially with donald trump, who has so much to say about some different things, with people wondering what he's really saying. and of course, the fascinating thought for people here at westminster — looking ahead, he says he has invited theresa may to the white house as soon as he gets there. the idea of the two of them eating and holding a joint press conference, you couldn't get two more different personalities. how that relationship works is going to be incredibly fascinating. but of course, with britain leaving the eu, it becomes even more important than the special relationship has been before. thank you very much. and you can watch full coverage of donald trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the united states here on bbc news. our coverage begins on friday afternoon at 3 o'clock in the afternoon live from washington with katty kay, with the new president sworn in at 5pm.
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the pound has fallen to a three month low against the dollar in early trading in asia because of speculation that the uk might leave the single market as part of brexit. some analysts predict theresa may will use a major speech tomorrow to say she's prepared to leave the single market to get more control over immigration. downing street has described the reports as "speculation". northern ireland's devolved government looks set to collapse today after sinn fein failed to nominate a new deputy first minister to replace martin mcguinness. the northern ireland secretary will now have to call a snap election. it follows the scandal of a failed renewable energy scheme which could cost almost half a billion pounds. the scheme was overseen by arlene foster before she became first minister — and she's resisted calls to step aside for an investigation. annita mcveigh is in stormont for us. good afternoon from the great hall
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of stormont. if you look over my shoulder at that screen in the background, that is the assembly, sitting right now and getting on with business. but it is rather surreal, because as you mentioned, just a short while ago, sinn fein confirmed that they would not be nominating anyone to take up the position of deputy first minister. and that, if you like, was the point of no return. it means that can't be a power—sharing executive. it therefore means the secretary of state, james brokenshire, will probably this evening have to call snap elections in northern ireland. after a week with no functioning government, this is the moment when northern ireland's power—sharing executive finally collapsed. today, sinn fein will not renominate for the position of deputy first minister. sinn fein has honoured all agreements. we have striven to make these institutions work. sinn fein‘s refusal
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to replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister means stormont can't operate any longer. that's because under the power—sharing system, the first and deputy first ministers can't work in isolation from each other. a new election may be called as early as this evening. northern ireland does not need, nor does its people want, an election. with the triggering of article 50 to leave the european union, a new president in the united states of america, a volatile global economy, now, more than ever, northern ireland needs stable government. long—running tensions between the democratic unionists and sinn fein came to a head over a financial scandal about a green energy scheme. the renewable heat incentive began in 2012. it had overly—generous subsidies and initially no upper payment limits. the scheme closed in february last year, having run almost half a billion pounds over budget. political controversy grew.
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the dup leader, arlene foster, had previously been the minister in charge of the project. in december, sinn fein said she should temporarily stand down as first minister. she repeatedly refused. seven days ago, martin mcguinness resigned in protest. the power—sharing partnership between irish republicans and unionists has always been uneasy and it's often been unstable. restoring it may take some time and people here are worried about the prospect of losing their devolved government. a key moment for the stormont executive had been due to come this week. an inquiry has been examining the scale of historical child abuse in residential institutions. its report will be published on friday, but now it looks like there will be no ministers to act on the recommendations. we just didn't want to believe that as soon as sir anthony hart's report was ready and delivered on friday, there's the collapse of the government and the collapse of our dreams and hopes and desires that this was going to be our day.
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there are many concerns, frustrations and questions as northern ireland faces an uncertain political future. after ten years, the latest stormont stalemate has brought about the downfall of devolution. chris page, bbc news, stormont. let's talk about this in more depth 110w let's talk about this in more depth now with the commentator alex kane. this power—sharing executive has weathered many a crisis. what is it about this particular crisis and the personalities that means things are unravelling as we speak?|j personalities that means things are unravelling as we speak? i think it is because after the next leave last election, when sinn fein and the dup did commend as he well, —— they did tremendously well, writing joint articles in the local newspaper saying, we are providing good government while the opposition is grandstanding and gimmicks. nobody
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saw this coming, but suddenly it all just collapsed. and when something collapses like that without warning, and with a whole list of things we weren't aware of, it is difficult to put them back together quickly. but why was that? was one side feeling that this institution didn't work for them any longer? certainly, martin mcguinness said there was a lack of respect for him. but he'll says that in terms of parity of esteem for republicanism, for the irish language and general culture, there was no equality. after ten years, you talked about having made a huge effort moving his people and his own constituency and even now, nothing was happening. there was nothing was happening. there was nothing in this for republicanism any more. so this is clearly about much more than a green energy scheme, although that may be the peg on which this crisis hangs. yes, this started off as a run—of—the—mill political scandal about money and overspend. it didn't need to come to an election. it came to an election because suddenly, we realised that the relationship
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between arlene foster and martin mcguinness was appalling. on the back of that deteriorating relationship, all sorts of other complaints from both sides came in. and suddenly, you wake up and realise these people actually despise each other. when we pick up the pieces, that is what will make it enormously difficult. it looks inevitable that come five o'clock this evening, the power—sharing executive will be no more and it is probable that the secretary of state will be calling elections. a 2—part question — what does that mean in terms of northern ireland's voice in any brexit negotiations, and what does it mean for the uk and the timetable for the wider brexit process ? timetable for the wider brexit process? in terms of northern ireland, if they have the election and don't pick up the pieces, there will not be an executive to negotiate with london or with dublin. it also means that northern ireland will find its voice being the prime minister's voice, theresa
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may's. sinn fein will not want that. sinn fein are very keen to stay in the european union. they do not want to theresa may representing their voice. but if they are not in government themselves, they have no right of access to the irish government either. james brokenshire says it will not affect the government's brexit timetable. says it will not affect the government's brexit timetablelj government's brexit timetable.” think it will, because you will have a situation where the sdlp and sinn fein are going to say no one is representing their voice in these talks. they don't want the irish government or theresa may doing it. it will lead to a huge problem and it will knock the timetable of course. alex kane, thank you for your thoughts. after elections, which it is most likely will be called, the parties would have three weeks to try to bring a power—sharing executive back together, three weeks to hammer out all the issues the parties are concerned about. that seems a very short period indeed. that may mean
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very protracted negotiations before we could get back to this power—sharing arrangement that has been standing for almost 20 years 110w. been standing for almost 20 years now. as alex kane was just saying, that could certainly have an impact on brexit for northern ireland and for the government's timetable. we will keep an eye what happens this afternoon. the headlines on bbc news: donald trump promises a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. northern ireland's power sharing government looks set to collapse today, sparking fresh elections. inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed at a beach resort in tunisia in 2015 have opened at london's high court. and in sport, andy murray is through to the second round of the australian open. he beat ukraine's illya marchenko in straight sets. dan illya marchenko in straight sets. da n eva ns illya marchenko in straight sets. dan evans is also through. commonwealth swimming champion fran
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halsall has announced her retirement from the sport. she won over 30 medals that european and commonwealth level, but says she's ready for the next chapter of her life. and four—time olympic champion laura kenny has pulled out of the track cycling championships with a hamstring injury. the also cas doubts on her participation at the world championships in april. more on those stories just after 2.30. the former football coach, barry bennell, has pleaded not guilty to eight charges of child sex offences. the former crewe alexandra coach appeared via videolink at chester crown court. let's speak to our sports correspondent who's in chester andy swiss. what happened in court? as you say, barry bennell didn't appear here in person. instead, he appeared via video link from woodhill prison in milton keynes, where he is currently on remand. we saw him on a tv, wearing a blue jumper.
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on remand. we saw him on a tv, wearing a bluejumper. he spoke only to confirm his name and then to plead not guilty to eight charges of sexual assault against a boy aged under 16. the offences are alleged to have taken place between 1981 and 1986 at three different locations, at venice fell in derbyshire, at nantwich in cheshire and today —— at a butlins holiday camp. barry bennell is a former football coach with crewe alexandra. he has also worked with other clubs across the north—west including stoke city and manchester city. he has been remanded in custody. he will next appear here at chester crown court on march the 20th. a house in north manchester has been destroyed by an explosion this morning. emergency services were called to cecil road in blackley. one man was taken to hospital. four others were treated for minor injuries. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists who were killed
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in tunisia 18 months ago have begun in london. they were shot dead by a lone gunman at a five—star beach resort near sousse. it was the deadliest terror attack on britons since thejuly 7th bombings in london in 2005. our correspondent richard galpin is at the royal courts ofjustice. it has been a sombre start to the inquest, with the names of the 38 people killed in the attack being read out one by one in court. then eve ryo ne read out one by one in court. then everyone stood for a minute of silence. of course, a lot of the families of those killed are now watching these proceedings closely, either at the court here or via video link from courts around the country. and already, some families have broken down in tears as they have broken down in tears as they have been shown cctv footage of the attack as it unfolded. the families of those killed in the attack have waited a year
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and a half for this moment. now, with the full inquest finally getting under way this morning, they are hoping for answers to some critical questions. the gunman, seifeddine resgui, a 23—year—old student armed with an automatic rifle and grenades, began his attack on the beach. systematically shooting dead british and other european holiday—makers as they sunbathed and swam. from the beach, resgui, who trained at an islamic state camp in libya, killed and injured more tourists in the hotel complex. amid the panic, local shopkeepers managed to save some people by sheltering them inside. gunfire. the attack continued for more than half an hour until eventually, a large group of policemen arrived and shot him dead. it's alleged other police officers who had been nearby had been too frightened to tackle him.
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leading to one hotel worker snatching a policeman‘s gun and trying to shoot resgui himself. but the gunjammed and resgui threw a grenade at him. and all this just three months afterjihadis carried out this attack inside one of the country's most famous museums, in the capital, tunis. once again, tourists were the target. 22 people were killed. and it is alleged the same is cell was behind both attacks. now, almost two years later, tunisia remains on high alert. the country has long been a hotbed of jihadist activity, the security forces struggling to deal with the growth of islamic state. it's estimated 5,000 tunisians have fought for islamic state in iraq, syria and libya. and many have returned home in recent years. the coroner has made clear this
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morning that they will be looking at theissue morning that they will be looking at the issue of security at the hotel in sousse where the attack took place. it is also said that they will be looking at what they called the adequacy of the travel advice given by the foreign office and the travel company involved in booking a holiday. already, the councilfor the inquest has said that there is a lot of concern about the booking process. a 35—year—old man is in a stable condition in hospital after being injured in a shooting near a primary school in glasgow. police scotland said no one else was hurt in the incident, which happened close to st george's primary school. detectives say it appears to have been a targeted attack, but don't believe there is an ongoing threat to any other person. the coroner at the inquest into the death of a mother who died after an emergency caesarean section
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says her death was a result of "failures, inadequate diagnosis and treatment". frances cappuccini, who was 30, suffered a heart attack after an operation to stop heavy blood loss at tunbridge wells hospital. our correspondent charlie rose is at gravesend coroners court. what is the background to this? frances cappuccini died after the birth of her second child at tunbridge wells hospital. she was initially meant to go to the hospitalfor an initially meant to go to the hospital for an elective caesarean on the 10th of october in 2012. she was admitted two days earlier, when she went into labour. she then had a 12 hour labour before she had a ca esa rea n 12 hour labour before she had a caesarean section. initially after the birth, everything seemed normal, but it was then discovered that she was bleeding. she had suffered a haemorrhage because a piece of placenta had been left behind in her womb. the inquest heard that she lost 2.3 litres of blood. she also
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suffered breathing difficulties during her treatment and less than seven hours after her son was born, she suffered cardiac arrest and just over an hour after that, she was pronounced dead. the details surrounding her treatment and death have been examined here at an inquest and this morning, the coroner, roger hatch, recorded that her death was as a result of the failure is, inadequate diagnosis and treatment of her at the tunbridge wells hospital on the 9th of october 2012. wells hospital on the 9th of october 20 12. and what did he wells hospital on the 9th of october 2012. and what did he have wells hospital on the 9th of october 20 12. and what did he have to wells hospital on the 9th of october 2012. and what did he have to say about it? he made ten points on the balance of probability. he said the c section was not carried out with care. he said there should have been an examination to make sure that no pa rt an examination to make sure that no part of the placenta was left behind. he said the result of this failure led directly to the subsequent series of events which tragically ended the death of cappuccini. he also said the haemorrhage had not been managed in
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accordance with the trust's protocol. after the inquest finished, there was a statement on behalf of frances cappuccini's family, read out by their solicitor. she was bubbly, intelligent, beautiful, loving and much loved. failures of maidstone and tunbridge wells nhs trust and those employed by the trust cost frankie her life. nothing can heal that pain. at least today, after over four years, the truth is acknowledged. the trust has put out a statement. it said that it had recognised from the start that there were aspects of frances's care that fell short of the standards the trust would expect. it says, we wish to again sincerely apologise to the family for this. it goes on to say, asa family for this. it goes on to say, as a direct result of frances' death, the trust has made a number
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of changes to its processes that have improved patient safety. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather now with phil avery. what a grey day. just looking through the window here, dry is as optimistic as it gets in our neck of the woods. i can almost hear the chorus from some of you saying, at least it is dry for you. because under the thick swathes of cloud, there are bits and pieces of cloud, there are bits and pieces of rain and there is rain moving into scotland as well. temperature wise, despite the presence of a bit of sunshine in the east of scotland and along the eastern side of england, it is not doing much for temperatures in east anglia. milder air is coming in from the atlantic. we keep the blanket of cloud overnight. the northerly feature will sweep across scotland and northern ireland, where it stays
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mild. a touch of frost across east anglia and the south—east, but at least you have the chance of seeing meaningful sunshine here. further east, tuesday promises to be a decent day. mild air will congregate in southern and eastern parts. but it will stay on the cool side right through to wednesday. hello, this is bbc news with me, simon mccoy. the headlines at 2:30pm: the us president—elect donald trump has promised a "quick and fair" trade deal between the united states and britain. he said the uk was "doing great" following its vote for brexit. fresh assembly elections for northern ireland look likely to be called this afternoon. sinn fein has formally declined to nominate a replacement for martin mcguinness, who resigned as deputy first minister in protest at the handling of a controversial renewable energy scheme.
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the former football coach barry bennell has pleaded not guilty to eight charges of sexual assault against a boy under the age of 16. the offences are alleged to have happened in the 1980s, when he was a coach at crewe alexandra. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed by a lone gunman on a tunisian beach injune 2015, have opened in london. the court has been told that the tunisian security forces deliberately delayed their arrival at the scene. two people with serious injuries have been taken to hospital after an explosion almost completely destroyed a house in manchester this lunchtime. the cause of the explosion is not yet known. time to catch up with the sport with jessica at the bbc sport centre. and simon. we are starting with tennis. —— good afternoon, simon. andy murray has got his australian open campaign off to a winning start. he beat ukraine's illya marchenko in straight sets, although the world number one was made to battle by the world number 95. nick parrott reports. will this be the year andy murray
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finally steps out of the shadows at the australian open? he has reached five finals but is yet to win. top seed for first time at a grand slam. on the other side of the net was world number 95 illya marchenko. if anyone thought this would be a gentle introduction to the first big tournament of the year they were wrong. murray was given a good work—out in the 31 degrees heat, made to sweat for almost an hour before he could take the first set. the ukrainian was determined not to give the world number one is an easy ride, breaking at the first opportunity and second. the britain needed a tie—break to overcome his opponenfs needed a tie—break to overcome his opponent's stubborn resistance. after that, it was how many would have expected it to be from the sta rt— have expected it to be from the start— comfortable. murray rattled through the third. far from world —class through the third. far from world—class performance, but to be a champion you have to win when you are not at your best. i think marchenko played well, was very aggressive,
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so that made it hard. also the conditions, it was playing very fast out there, the ball was very lively, which it hasn't been, you know, in the practice week. so i found it hard, but managed to get through. dan evans is also through to the second round. he beat argentina's facundo bagnis in straight sets and is up against seventh seed marin cilic next. but british number four aljaz bedene is out. he lost to victor estrella burgos. commonwealth swimming champion fran halsall has announced her retirement from the sport. during an international career lasting over a decade, halsall made her olympic debut at beijing 2008 and narrowly missed out on medals at both london 2012 and rio 2016. she won over 30 medals at world, european and commonwealth level, but says she's ready for a new chapter in her life. four—time olympic champion laura kenny has pulled out of the british track cycling championships with a hamstring injury. a statement from british cycling says kenny will miss the event in manchester at the end of the month and is
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having treatment. the injury casts doubt on her participation at the world championships in april. formula 1 team sauber has signed mercedes reserve driver pascal wehrlein for next season. the highly—rated german had been one of the drivers in contention to replace nico rosberg at the constructors' champions. just a warning — there is some flash photography coming up. the 22—year—old raced for manor last season and had been part of mercedes' young driver programme. it's now thought a deal is almost complete for valtteri bottas to move from williams to mercedes to partner lewis hamilton. british sailor alex thomson has set a world record for the longest distance sailed solo in a day, in the vendee globe — that's the non—stop race around the world. thompson covered 536.8 miles, which averages out atjust over 25 miles per hour over a 24—hour period. now that he's broken the record, and reduced the gap on the leader, thompson wants to become the first briton to win the race. looking forward to it. been working
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ha rd looking forward to it. been working hard the last couple of days in the light breeze. not easy with an animatorjust there, light breeze. not easy with an animator just there, but light breeze. not easy with an animatorjust there, but not light breeze. not easy with an animator just there, but not too bad. getting enough sleep, eating well, ready for the last run in. i will give it my all and keep fingers crossed. as many as are of the opinion, say ‘aye'. to the contrary, ‘no'. some incredible pictures there. —— ‘aye'. to the contrary, ‘no'. some incredible pictures there. -- yes, there were some incredible pictures there. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. thank you, jessica. on friday, donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. his election to the white house followed one of the most bitter and divisive campaigns in history, and many have questioned how the new leader will unite the country. to find out, jon kay has set off on a road trip through the heart of america — along the iconic route 45 — travelling from north to south. today, in the first of a week—long series of reports, he's in wisconsin, a state that elected mr trump by the narrowest of margins. milwaukee.
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known for its harsh winters, for making cheese and beer, and now for its role in america's fragile new politics. go, go, go, go — right now. this is no place forfragile. junior ice hockey. this is the green bayjunior gamblers. jonathan is coaching the under—nines. he likes donald trump because he's different — a non—politician, an outsider. itjust goes back to an alternative that's outside of the box. a different viewpoint. he's a billionaire, though, isn't he? he's a tv star, he's not exactly everyman. no, he certainly is not, but i think there's something to be said for him being able to relate to, you know, a plumber, a welder, a teacher. the state of wisconsin switched sides in this election. its large white working class electorate normally votes democrat, but this time they chose trump. they like giving new things a try here. a little brassy, but i will give him
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a try. like soccer on ice. might a trump presidency end up feeling like this? even if it's risky. your gloves are nearly as big as my hands. engineerjason is confident. after nine redundancy threats in six years, he says it's time for a businessman in the oval ooffice. in the oval office. it will be nice to have a little bit more stability in a job front, so i'm hoping from an economic standpoint that trump reflects giving that stability back to the country. are you more optimistic for yourfamily? and for your own personal household economy? absolutely. confidence on the ice is another matter. for me, at least. twaddle and been!
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—— torvill and dean! some of america's top ice athletes practise on this rink. i understand you like to do this thing, but you're stopping to do that. you are not doing that much as much, correct? nancy was an olympian and is now a coach. it's time to be a little risky. she told me donald trump can bring a winner's mind set to the white house. trump makes a decision, he gets it done. do you have any reservations about his personality? i mean, the things he said about women, for example. yes, i think everybody who is behind him has some reservation, because they really don't know the truth behind that, and they're just hoping at this point in his life he has put that behind him. wisconsin may have voted trump, but only by 1%. and some here are still
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struggling with the result. this is one of the most importantjobs in the world, and i'm not certain he's prepared for it. but hockey mom layla is willing to give the new president a chance, even though as a muslim she is worried by some of his comments. i try to look at the bright side, so, ijust, i think they have to wait and see what happens. you sound to me like you're maybe a little nervous? yes, i might be. are you prepared to support him? not quite prepared to support him but i am prepare to initiate change to support him. what does that mean? how do you initiate change to support him? change my way of thinking, try to find the good. it is time for us to get our skates on. donald trump will be the 45th president of america so we are heading down route a5. travelling 1000 miles hearing from voters, tomorrow we will be chicago, to reflect on president obama's legacy. jon kay, bbc news, milwaukee. and you can watch full coverage of donald trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the united states here on bbc news. our coverage begins on friday afternoon at 3 o'clock in the afternoon — live from washington — with katy kay — with
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the new president sworn in at 5pm. a turkish cargo plane has crashed in kyrgyzstan, killing at least 37 people. the boeing 747, operated by act airlines, was en route from hong kong to istanbul in turkey, via kyrgyzstan‘s capital bishkek. these latest aerial pictures show the damage at the scene. rescue workers say the dead included all members of the crew, as well as several children. visibility was poor because of thick fog at the time, but the cause of the crash has not yet been confirmed. leanne brown reports. as parts of the wreckage smoulders in the snow, rescue teams continue to work on the ground. the cargo plane was heading to kyrgyzstan‘s capital, bishkek, but it crashed in a nearby village, before reaching the airport. the authorities say at least 37 people have been killed, including four crew members and several children. translation: i heard a strong
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noise and after that all the nearest houses were shaken. of course, everyone got frightened and started to run out the houses into the street. nobody understood what was going on because there was a fog. the weather wasn't good. there was thick fog at the time, but emergency services say other planes were managing to land successfully. translation: the ground services advised the visibility was within permitted limits, 325 metres. the crew received this information before landing. by the rules, it is the pilot in command who takes the decision. an investigation into the cause of the crash will now take place, and the country will observe a day of mourning on tuesday. as concerns continue about the state of the nhs doctors are warning that some patients face "dangerous"
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delays getting specialist treatment through their gps. the british medical association says referral management centres create barriers and take decisions away from gps. supporters of the system say it's a good way to manage resources. our correspondent jenny walrond reports. for traceyjeffries, housework is no longer a painful chore, but only because she paid nearly £3,000 for an operation on her leg. i was in so much pain with my leg, 2a hours a day. i wasn't sleeping properly, i was struggling to get through my work. the pain was caused by varicose veins. her gp wanted them treated on the nhs, but his referral was rejected. tracy had to go private. if a gp feels a specialist needs to look at you, then the nhs should be supporting that, and they are not. tracy's treatment was blocked by something called a referral management centre. some are run by doctors, others by admin staff. there were over 13.5 million gp referrals in england last year.
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more than two million of them were screened by referral management centres on behalf of the nhs. a rise of almost 30% compared to two years before. 4% — more than 84,000 — were rejected. mostly for admin reasons, like missing information. doctors' leaders are strongly opposed to what they say is a blunt form of rationing. these centres, which are taking a crude approach to scrutinising all gp referrals, can be inefficient, cost more to run than any potential saving, but crucially, in the process, delaying patient care. referral management centres are used by one third of england's clinical commissioning groups. there are 61 of them in england and wales. gatekeeping what are often expensive, hospital—based service. we have not found similar set ups in scotland, or northern ireland. those who commission nhs care say the system delivers value for money. we don't want to squander any money,
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we have limited resources, so it is really important the resource we have we spend most effectively, and get the best value for our population. referral management is, for now, a relatively small part of efforts to manage rising demand, but its use is increasing, and that means more gps, like tracey‘s, are likely to see their decisions scrutinised and even overturned. and there will be special programmes on the nhs tonight in inside out at half past seven on bbc one in england — and later on the bbc iplayer. in a moment a summary of the business news, this hour but first the headlines on bbc news: donald trump promises a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday.
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northern ireland's power sharing government looks set to collapse today sparking fresh elections. inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed at a beach resort in tunisia in 2015 have opened at london's high court. in the business news: the pound has hit its lowest level for more than three months — it fell below the $1.20 level before recovering slightly on monday. analysts said traders were reacting to reports that the uk prime minister theresa may would use a speech on tuesday to signal britain would quit the single marker. quit the single market. bt recorded more than 31 million nuisance calls in a single week before christmas. it said more than 12 million of those were about accident claims. you may not have heard of luxottica and essilor, but they are massive players in what might be called the eye—wear market.
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essilor makes lenses and luxottica makes sunglasses, ray—ban among them. they are merging and together will be worth about £40 billion. it's safe to say that it would be hard to find a technology company in silicon valley who would own up to voting for donald trump last november. donald trump was particularly critical of the number of immigrants that these companies were recruiting. according to a study by the national foundation for american policy, immigrants founded more than half of the current crop of us—based start—ups valued at more than $1 billion. well, they're having to adapt to a very different political landscape now — our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones has been to san francisco to find out more. san francisco, in effect the capital of silicon valley and the epicentre of silicon valley and the epicentre of the technology industry. but looming over everything right now is the prospect of a president the majority of californians did not
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vote for. one tech firm, here, the memory of his election still hurts. it felt like someone died in the family, it felt like 9/11, everyone is still in shock. we thought hillary for sure was going to win, then the next day trump wins and you kind of wonder, what is the rest of america like? this company's owner michael birch arrived here from the uk but is now an american citizen and trying to be positive. one thing silicon valley certainly is is very innovative, so in the face of what is happening with trump i think we will innovate around it and find a way to go forward. in securing his —— pursuing his campaign donald trump was not exactly friendly to the tech business. what i think you should do is boycott apple. but there is an upside. like a number of tech giants, apple has one reason to be optimistic about donald trump.
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you could offer them a deal to bring billions of dollars of cash held overseas home at a favourable tax rate. the price of that to be increasing pressure to build the iphonein increasing pressure to build the iphone in the united states rather than china. if you can maintain the cost for the consumer, sure, but i don't think that is possible.” think it would be great, yeah, i mean, the more the merrier for being in america. being made in america, i guess. whatever their reservations about him, the bosses of apple, amazon and other tech giants had quite a polite meeting with the president elect last month. america's most prominent technology journalist said they should be far more robust. i think they need to be outspoken in ways they have been co mforta ble outspoken in ways they have been comfortable being outspoken before, on issues of privacy, about immigration, on issues of encryption, all kinds of things that have been very important to their employees. these are the most powerful people on the planet, and
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the richest, so they have nothing to fear by expressing themselves. but the tech industry's big hope is that the tech industry's big hope is that the new president will come to see that it the new president will come to see thatitis the new president will come to see that it is going to underpin america's future prosperity, and let it get on with the job. let's ta ke let's take a look at some of today's other business stories. nearly half of working fathers would like a less stressfuljob so they can spend more time caring for their children. a study for the charity working families says about a third of dads would take a pay cut to achieve a better work—life balance. facebook stories to tackle fake news will now pass to a third—party fact checker, and it can be marked as disputed in the news feed. the world's eight richest individuals
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have as much wealth as the bottom 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest in the world according to oxfam. not everybody agrees with oxfam's figures, criticised by institutions such as adam smith institute. you can find analysis of oui’ institute. you can find analysis of our story on the business page of the bbc website. a quick look at the markets before we go... the ftse appears to have taken a little bit ofa appears to have taken a little bit of a dive into the negative territory. however, it has been doing quite well this morning, with a fall doing quite well this morning, with afall in doing quite well this morning, with a fall in the pound helping companies on the ftse 100, a fall in the pound helping companies on the ftse100, mining companies on the ftse100, mining companies among those doing well. that is it for business for this hour. plenty more business to come throughout the afternoon. back to you, simon. thank you. as we heard in the business news... nearly half of working fathers would like a less stressfuljob so they can spend more time caring for their children. earlier, three working fathers spoke to the victoria derbyshire programme aboutjuggling theirjobs with that of being a dad.
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i have been occupied with my business inside out for the last yea rs business inside out for the last years and i spend so much of my time doing that. obviously there are a lot of inputs in business coming from the owner's side, so travelling, putting my head down with the business. is a 24—hour market i have to be more vigilant on that. as i said, in a fraction of a second you are on the other side of the game and you lose the business completely. what about your children? i have three, and the oldest is almost 30 now. our eldest son, ten, and a daughter, eight. you are seeing —— we are seeing their picture now. you would like to spend more time with them? definitely. martin, you can see how he needs to be there and be vigilant with his business, but what advice would you
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give to him? i think you're beautifully realising the richness spending time with your children gives you, a richness beyond mere salary or remuneration. ijacked my job in for six months when i was working 70 hours a week, because not seeing my child at bath—time and story time, but not seeing my wife, who i wasn't able to support, it was just making me miserable. i wasjust turning forte, and i thought, what is my wife about quiz that jacques turning 40, and i thought, what is my life about? —— i was just turning. my life as a human or as a businessman? but can men have it all? yes, but the flip side we want -- is all? yes, but the flip side we want —— is that we want supported, and through shared parental leave we get two weeks, statutory minimum pay, then that is it, so we have to go back to work even when we do not wa nt to back to work even when we do not want to and we are seeing men downscaling, taking jobs perhaps beneath their abilities because they wa nt beneath their abilities because they want that. so we are seeing the fatherhood gap emerging. do you
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agree with that, tom, the fatherhood gap? i would agree, yes. it is very difficult. workplaces, they still don't seem to understand what it can be like for working parents who also happened to be male, yes. do you think men can have it all? fulfilling successfuljob and all that time with their kids that they want? i don't know about having it all. i do often see i have the best of both worlds, though, so maybe i am contradicting myself there. because you work from home?m am contradicting myself there. because you work from home? it is not perfect, but, yes, iwork because you work from home? it is not perfect, but, yes, i work from home so get more time with my wife and kids and get to do my work as well. it is stressful, like any other existence, but it is certainly better than my previous existence, for sure. what will you do them? what changes might you make or consider making? as my son is growing, he has gone to secondary school, i think he looks to me as a mentor, someone who can
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school, i think he looks to me as a mentor, someone who can come school, i think he looks to me as a mentor, someone who can come forward and spend time with him, you know, and spend time with him, you know, andi and spend time with him, you know, and i realise that quite late to be honest. there are two things to it, one is being a father, and one is giving the best for my kids. you work hard, said the business, start earning money, but the dark side is you cannot give time to your kids. what would you change, if anything? i think i will take a break off my work and slow down a little on myjob site, take it easy, probably employ someone else to take the role and give some more time to my kids, especially at this stage, because as i said my child has gone to secondary school and definitely needs near there. since i have taken a break out of my work i have realised spending time with my kids, they need me right now, they need someone they need me right now, they need someone to guide them, you know. this is the time. if i don't give that time, it will not come again. for sure. much more on the victoria derbyshire programme page,
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bbc.co.uk/victoria. you're watching bbc news. a teenager who was snatched from a hospital in florida as a baby 18 years ago has been reunited with her biological father. the teenager was abducted when she was just eight hours old. she was tracked down after a tip—off. the woman she thought was her real mother has been charged with kidnapping. sian grzeszcyk reports. for the last 18 years kamiyah mobley had no reason to think gloria was her real mother, and no reason to think her own name wasn't alexis, but now she is trying to deal with the news that the person she thought was her more for all that time, is under arrest charged with kidnapping her, just after she was born, and giving her a false identity. 51—year—old gloria williams is being held in south carolina after dna tested proved that it was baby kamiyah, snatched from hospital in 1998. police say she posed as a nurse and snuck the newborn out of the hospital, starting a frantic search.
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at the time her real mother was distraught and desperate to find her. i just want to know where my baby is, i want my baby back. but now, 18 years later, she was delighted to be reunited with her the daughter she had never thought she would see again. and kamiyah‘s biological father was overwhelmed after meeting herfor the first time. you can't explain the feelings. it is hard to put it in words, right now, it is hard to deal with this right now — we just, like we say, we are trying to process 18 years. it will be hard to make that up. but the man who thought he was her father, all this time, is full of heartache. that is the name i have for years, she is the love of my life. she said, dad i love you. she is sill my child.
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i love herjust that much. that is not going to change, that she is is the love of my life. she is my child. now it is kamiyah who has to come to terms with what has happened, with he new identity, her new family. time for a look at the weather. phil avery is on the other side of the newsroom, bringing a bit of grey to blue monday. laughter unwarranted laughter unwarra nted enthusiasm there. laughter unwarranted enthusiasm there. what a great build—up, and just about right for the weather i have to offer you. looking behind you, that was the lead and seen across the aisle of anglesey just a while lead and seen across the aisle of angleseyjust a while ago captured by one of our weather watchers. thankfully, if only despite simon, it is not like it everywhere. one or two are enjoying absolutely beautiful skies here. this was sterling. central and eastern scotla nd sterling. central and eastern scotland are doing quite nicely. you canjust scotland are doing quite nicely. you can just about make out these two great swathes of cloud lying on either side of stirling —— this was
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stirling. the more northerly feature, a cold front working in from the atlantic. it is all relative and there will not be a real drop in temperatures there. further south, this one gave quite a wet start across the east midlands and east anglia and down into the south—east. only four or 5 degrees at the moment in kent and we will return to that malarkey in that neck of the woods in just a second, but out west it is on the mild side, 10 degrees both in inverness and down into parts of the south west. overnight, there is more northerly feature down across the northern half of britain is keeping a relatively mild, computer east anglia and the south—east. there will be a little touch of frost to start the day on tuesday. i think the one pay off as you might actually see a decent amount of sunshine here, anywhere from about here down to the isle of wight. the eastern side of scotland doing pretty well again. if you have not had mentioned thus far, mild, yes, but could be cloudy. four or 5
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degrees down here, so monday and tuesday are pretty similar. certainly regarding the temperatures we will keep it mild across the greater part of scotland and northern ireland. i will show you the direction of travel of this from the direction of travel of this from the atlantic in just a second. into the atlantic in just a second. into the south—eastern quarter, it is not just monday and tuesday that will be on the cool side by day and night, but this is your daytime maximum, we suspect, for somewhere across the south—east. the reason for this is you are not getting your error from the atlantic at all but are tapping in to something cooler here, certainly prevailing across the greater part of the continent and thatis greater part of the continent and that is not just moscow but also madrid —— cooler air, and some of that never has been displaced by the milder air are slumping in from the atlantic. this is the setup for wednesday. this front is really quite weak so there are bits and pieces of rain around but essentially a lot of dry weather. but again that is in the
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south—eastern quarter that we keep it cool. if you want some keep it will be the north and west for you. -- if will be the north and west for you. —— if you want some heat. this is bbc news.
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the headlines at 3pm. donald trump promises a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. obama said you'll go to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen, and then he had to retract. that was a bad statement. what is the front of the queue? i think you're doing great. fresh assembly elections for northern ireland look likely as sinn fein refuses to nominate a new deputy first minister. i'm at stormont. we'll keep you up—to—date with all the developments here this afternoon. we are a couple of hours ago way from the deadline that will mean the effective colla pse that will mean the effective collapse of the power—sharing executive. an inquest hears a gunman who shot and killed 38 tourists at a beach resort in tunisia in 2015 could have been stopped sooner. a house explosion in manchester has injured five people, two seriously.

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